Radiohead Concert Posters

Friday 09th of December 2016 07:12:58 PM

by King


Radiohead Concert Posters


Posters of Radiohead in Concert

RadioHead Concert Poster In Rainbows

RadioHead Concert Poster In Rainbows

August 20, 2008 seattle, washington stop of the “In Rainbows” Tour Poster
Price $9.99





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LOW INVENTORY ITEM, (One Left), It may be pulled for auction if it does not sell by midnight >>> 12 hours 47 minutes 2 seconds << Act now to OWN this



I didn’t have to worry about being the solitary man grooving, or even the solitary man spasmodically dancing, because at a Radiohead show the solitary man spasmodically dancing is Thom Yorke. He is the one design element out of place on the Radiohead stage– the one human being who does not have an immediate match in a band of bald drummers and lanky, dark-haired string players; the one human being who’s free to move and, on rare occasions, to speak. What Radiohead shows you at a Radiohead show is both the art and the brokenness, in the form of stage lighting that rigorously color-codes every song, and twelve screens suspended over the stage that allow you to glimpse but never quite see the faces of the band, like shards of a busted mirror.

Even though Radiohead’s discography stretches back to 1993, the performance drew heavily from the band’s post-2000 work. The group ignored the music of its first two, and most-commercial, albums, played the eight-song “The King of Limbs” in its entirety, and hopscotched among songs from “Kid A,” “Hail to the Thief” and “In Rainbows”– experimental, layered works that beg to be listened to on headphones and lose much in the transition to the arena stage.

I liked the show, because Radiohead, to me, is like a woman with overwhelming beauty and radical politics– I am willing to subject myself to the one in order to be exposed to the other. But not everybody did, and I met them at an Atlanta hotel bar on the way home. They were a married couple, and they were angry because they had driven four and a half hours from Nashville in order to see a band they didn’t know anymore. It played three songs from Kid A. It played one song from The Bends. “And the worst part,” the husband said, “is that Jonny Greenwood didn’t play one guitar solo. Not one! Come on! The next time we think about driving to see Radiohead, we’re going to demand a written guarantee: We’ll buy a ticket, but first you have to agree to give us what we want.”.

During the sold-out first show of a two-month tour that will take the widely acclaimed band across the United States and into Mexico, Radiohead came across unprepared at best and listless at worst. Beset by languid material and an apparent disinterest in building any momentum from one song to the next, the six-piece British act became something that once would have seemed unimaginable to its fans: Radiohead was a bore.

I didn’t think they were going to get that kind of contract from Radiohead anytime soon. I did, however, know a band that offered exactly what they were looking for– that guaranteed three hours of ecstatic communion, even when it was playing an acoustic show. But that band wasn’t as big as Radiohead, and besides, it was taking some time off, trying to disappear.



Radiohead Wants You
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